Elizabeth Bathory – 16th century deranged serial killer or victim of betrayal?

ancientorigins:

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Countess Elizabeth Báthory is recorded as being one of the most prolific serial killers in history, and is estimated to have brutally tortured and killed between 80 and 650 young women between 1585 and 1610.  But in recent years, the truth behind these tales has been brought into question and some scholars now argue that Elizabeth Báthory was no murderer, but rather the victim of political betrayal. 

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Source: ancientorigins

thehotlinetofrostrup:

Here is some really cool are I found in regards to Elizabeth Bathory the a.k.a. The Blood Countess

Source: thehotlinetofrostrup
Source: evilcorey
thisfalconwhite:

On this day in history…
21 August 1614: Countess Elizabeth Bathory dies.

Elizabeth Bathory, born in 1560, was the wife of Count Ferenc Nadasdy of Hungary. Elizabeth gave her husband seven children and looked after his estates while he was away fighting the Ottomans. Ferenc died in 1604, leaving Elizabeth a wealthy widow. In 1610, Holy Roman Emperor Matthias II ordered officials to investigate rumors that the countess was committing certain atrocities against the people living in her lands. The investigations revealed that Elizabeth had lured a number of peasants and lesser gentry - mostly young girls - to her estates with the promise of work or the chance to learn courtly etiquette. Many others were abducted by force. Once these individuals were under Elizabeth’s custody, she had them tortured, mutilated, and murdered. Accusations included beatings, burnings, mutilations, and forced starvation. On 30 December 1610, Elizabeth was arrested for her crimes, and later placed under house arrest. Elizabeth’s servants and accomplices were brought to trial and there were executed, but the countess remained under arrest without any further punishment until her death in 1614. Elizabeth Bathory’s crimes gave her the nickname, “The Bloody Countess.” In the nineteenth century, with the emergence of popular vampire myths, stories of Elizabeth drinking the blood of her victims began to circulate. Some historians even argue that the countess’s sadistic atrocities influenced Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

thisfalconwhite:

On this day in history…

21 August 1614: Countess Elizabeth Bathory dies.

Elizabeth Bathory, born in 1560, was the wife of Count Ferenc Nadasdy of Hungary. Elizabeth gave her husband seven children and looked after his estates while he was away fighting the Ottomans. Ferenc died in 1604, leaving Elizabeth a wealthy widow. In 1610, Holy Roman Emperor Matthias II ordered officials to investigate rumors that the countess was committing certain atrocities against the people living in her lands. The investigations revealed that Elizabeth had lured a number of peasants and lesser gentry - mostly young girls - to her estates with the promise of work or the chance to learn courtly etiquette. Many others were abducted by force. Once these individuals were under Elizabeth’s custody, she had them tortured, mutilated, and murdered. Accusations included beatings, burnings, mutilations, and forced starvation. On 30 December 1610, Elizabeth was arrested for her crimes, and later placed under house arrest. Elizabeth’s servants and accomplices were brought to trial and there were executed, but the countess remained under arrest without any further punishment until her death in 1614. Elizabeth Bathory’s crimes gave her the nickname, “The Bloody Countess.” In the nineteenth century, with the emergence of popular vampire myths, stories of Elizabeth drinking the blood of her victims began to circulate. Some historians even argue that the countess’s sadistic atrocities influenced Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

Source: thisfalconwhite

themagyar:

On this day, 400 years ago, the Hungarian countess Elizabeth Bathory died. Bathory is known to be one of the most proficient female killers in known history. She was known to slaughter and then bathe in virgin blood as a way to preserve her youth and beauty. Many vampire tales are derived from Bathory’s actions. Although Bram Stoker used Vlad the Impaler as the basis for his story of Dracula, Bathory is often seen as the precursor to the modern vampire.

Source: occams-lazer
yasoume:

a piece I did for a class (again) about Elizabeth Bathory, did it as an advertisement piece because I thought it was funny and witty .-.

yasoume:

a piece I did for a class (again) about Elizabeth Bathory, did it as an advertisement piece because I thought it was funny and witty .-.

(via terrorofthewoods)

Source: yasoume
theantlerkid:

Just a project I did for a class.  The woman is based on the historical figure Elizabeth Bathory.  While I was designing this I borrowed heavily from Alphonse Mucha.

theantlerkid:

Just a project I did for a class.  The woman is based on the historical figure Elizabeth Bathory.  While I was designing this I borrowed heavily from Alphonse Mucha.

Source: theantlerkid
a-little-pieceofme:

Stay Alive (movie)

a-little-pieceofme:

Stay Alive (movie)

Source: a-little-pieceofme
Source: scarylary
crocadokan:

My take on the crazy-ass blood bathing Elizabeth Bathory (which I first knew from Castlevania Bloodlines. Fuck my unculture.

crocadokan:

My take on the crazy-ass blood bathing Elizabeth Bathory (which I first knew from Castlevania Bloodlines. Fuck my unculture.

Source: crocadokan
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